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Austria’s best-selling newspaper says the government’s introduction of a mandatory vaccination policy has had no discernible impact on jab uptake

Austria’s best-selling newspaper says the government’s introduction of a mandatory vaccination policy has had no discernible impact on jab uptake in the nation’s capital and could have even caused a drop-off.

Since the compulsory jab mandate came into force on February 5, Kronen Zeitung reports that the law actually caused a reduction in the number of people being vaccinated.

“There is no mandatory vaccination effect – and if there is, then rather in the other direction,” the newspaper reported.

There was a significant reduction in the number of people getting vaccinated on February 6, one day after the mandate was imposed, a trend that was also noted on February 12.

“All in all, the Austrian instruments relating to measures and vaccination do not result in a well-rounded strategy and have no recognizable goal,” the the office of City Councilor for Health Peter Hacker told Kronen Zeitung. “That is why no run on vaccinations is to be expected in the coming days and weeks.”

While the mandate failed to boost vaccination rates, it did succeed as prompting Canadian trucker-style protests in Austria.

As we highlighted last week, enforcement of the jab mandate is nothing less than draconian.

Citizens are being stopped randomly in the street and pulled over in their vehicles and forced to comply with vaccine status checks by police.

As we previously reported, authorities the Austrian government announced they would hire people to “hunt down vaccine refusers.”

Austrians who don’t get vaccinated face fines of up to €7,200 ($8,000) for non-compliance, and those who refuse to pay would also face a 12 month jail sentence.

Days after imposing a lockdown in November that only applied to the unvaccinated, Austria hit a new COVID case record.

Article: Forced Vaccination Policy in Austria Has No Impact on Jab Uptake

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