Menu Close

Sweden declares the pandemic to be “over”

Sweden, a country which never imposed significant lockdown measures, has officially declared that the COVID-19 pandemic is “over” and announced that it will be lifting all remaining restrictions.

“As we know this pandemic, I would say it’s over,” Minister of Health Lena Hallengren told Dagens Nyheter. “It’s not over, but as we know it in terms of quick changes and restrictions it is.”

According to Reuters, these comments were as close as possible to the country “effectively declaring the pandemic over.”

From today, bars and restaurants are allowed to stay open beyond 11pm again and there are no limits on guest numbers.

Attendance limits for indoor venues and vaccine passports, which were temporarily introduced in response to the Omicron variant, have both been scrapped.

Most testing rules for COVID-19 have also been abolished.

Sweden being the first country to declare the pandemic a done deal will be sure to infuriate lockdown fanatics and mask zealots.

Despite being on the receiving end of an intense backlash, the country’s approach of refusing to impose harsh lockdown restrictions has been completely vindicated.

Unlike other Europeans countries such as France and Spain which imposed draconian lockdown rules, Sweden’s COVID-19 death rate is comparatively better and the country is exiting the pandemic while other nations are refusing to lift restrictions for at least months more.

The Scandinavian country did not enforce strict mask mandates, with senior epidemiologist Anders Tengell asserting that face coverings were in fact “dangerous” because they provided a false sense of security while failing to stop the spread of the virus.

As we highlighted in October 2020, Sweden again refused to follow other European countries by re-imposing lockdown rules, arguing that those beset by loneliness and misery of being isolated had suffered enough.

Article: Sweden Declares the Pandemic to be “Over”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

(UN General Assembly, 1948) The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: 1. All human beings are free and equal 2. No discrimination 3. Right to life 4. No slavery 5. No torture and inhuman treatment 6. Same right to use law 7. Equal before the law 8. Right to be treated fair by court 9. No unfair detainment 10. Right to trial 11. Innocent until proved guilty 12. Right to privacy 13. Freedom to movement and residence 14. Right to asylum 15. Right to nationality 16. Rights to marry and have family 17. Right to own things 18. Freedom of thought and religion 19. Freedom of opinion and expression 20. Right to assemble 21. Right to democracy 22. Right to social security 23. Right to work 24. Right to rest and holiday 25. Right of social service 26. Right to education 27. Right of cultural and art 28. Freedom around the world 29. Subject to law 30. Human rights can’t be taken away